Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. No one can, with certainty, say one thing is beautiful, and another is not because it is something of an opinion. What is attractive to one person is not necessarily beautiful to another. But everyone has a beauty concept in mind and society or culture has one, too.

It’s good to know what that is–and how one can tap into it, with individual choices–or decide to make fashion and beauty choices based on an alternative beauty concept, standing as an alternative rather than reflecting the mainstream beauty concept.

To find your beauty concept, try a questionnaire.

Questions like these can help you to figure out your personal beauty meter–or approach to finding what works in terms of fashion and beauty to make you feel beautiful. Feeling beautiful, inside and out, is probably the goal–not to appeal to others but to figure out how to reflect your concept of beauty.

A great question to start with is, “how do I feel when I wear this color?

What colors make me feel vibrant, alive, and beautiful?

If beauty had a color, what would it be?

Which lipstick colors make me feel certain ways and why?”

Keeping a journal can help, too, just jotting down ideas about which colors connect to which feelings. Some people feel confident wearing certain colors and not others. Which connect you with a sense of inner or self-beauty? Corals, pinks, and bright colors can do this especially well.

Another way to figure out your personal beauty concept–and how to project it in your life–is to take notes, mentally, or in your journal about how you feel after certain haircuts, styles, hair color changes, etc. Try to observe your feelings about the change in hair color; if you’ve changed it to red, how do you feel four days after the change?

What are your tried and true stand-bys for reflecting your personal beauty concepts?

Be sure these travel with you–a curling iron, a flat iron, a hair dryer. Whatever it is that you need to tap into your personal beauty concept, it’s worth having some of those things with you during the day, certain colors of lipstick, lip gloss, your other eyeliner, etc. In the end, it doesn’t matter what the culture projects for the shared appearance concept: thin, younger skin, in shape and working out at the gym, etc.

You can work with other shared beauty concepts to connect to a feeling of belonging in terms of working with style and color. Working with both ideas can be pretty empowering and downright fun, so it’s good to consider which concepts you subscribe to and then how to project them with conscious choices in makeup, hair, accessories, clothing and shoe decisions.

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